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– AI: Measures, Maps and Taxonomies

Cambridge (UK) is awash with talks at the moment, and many of these are about artificial intelligence. On Tuesday (12th of March 2019) I went to a talk, as part of Cambridge University’s science festival, by José Hernández-Orallo (Universitat Politècnica de València), titled Natural or 'Artificial Intelligence? Measures, Maps and Taxonomies'.

José opened by pointing out that artificial intelligence was not a subset of human intelligence. Rather, it overlaps with it. After all, some artificial intelligence already far exceeds human intelligence in narrow domains such as playing games (Go, Chess etc.) and some identification tasks (e.g. face recognition). But, of course, human intelligence far outstrips artificial intelligence in its breadth and the amount of training needed to learn concepts.

José Hernández-Orallo
José Hernández-Orallo

José‘s main message was how, when it comes to understanding artificial intelligence, we (like the political scene in Britain at the moment) are in uncharted territory. We have no measures by which we can compare artificial and human intelligence or to determine the pace of progress in artificial intelligence. We have no maps that enable us to navigate around the space of artificial intelligence offerings (for example, which offerings might be ethical and which might be potentially harmful). And lastly, we have no taxonomies to classify approaches or examples of artificial intelligence.

Whilst there are many competitions and benchmarks for particular artificial intelligence tasks (such as answering quiz questions or more generally reinforcement learning), there is no overall, widely used classification scheme.

Intelligence not included
Intelligence not included

My own take on this is to suggest a number of approaches that might be considered. Coming from a psychology and psychometric testing background, I am aware of the huge number of psychological testing instruments for both intelligence and many other psychological traits. See for example, Wikipedia or the British Psychological Society list of test publishers. What is interesting is that, I would guess, most software applications that claim to use artificial intelligence would fail miserably on human intelligence tests, especially tests of emotional and social intelligence. At the same time they might score at superhuman levels with respect to some very narrow capabilities. This illustrates just how far away we are from the idea of the singularity - the point at which artificial intelligence might overtake human intelligence.

Another take on this would be to look at skills. Interestingly, systems like the Amazon's Alexa describe the applications or modules that developers offer as 'skills'. So for example, a skill might be to book a hotel or to select a particular genre of music. This approach defines intelligence as the ability to effectively perform some task. However, by any standard, the skill offered by a typical Alexa 'skill', Google Home or Siri interaction is laughably unintelligent. The artificial intelligence is all in the speech recognition, and to some extent the speech production side. Very little of it is concerned with the domain knowledge. Even so, a skills based approach to measurement, mapping and taxonomy might be a useful way forward.

When it comes to Ethics, There are also some pointers to useful measures, maps and taxonomies. For example the blog post describing Josephine Young’s work identifies a number of themes in AI and data ethics. Also, the video featuring Dr Michael Wilby on the http://www.robotethics.co.uk/robot-ethics-video-links/ page starts with a taxonomy of ethics and then maps artificial intelligence into this framework.

But, overall, I would agree with José that there is not a great deal of work in this important area and that it is ripe for further research. If you are aware of any relevant research then please get in touch.